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Hawai’i: Stars and Pines

Diamond Head Cemetery. A Cook pine from New Caledonia. Yellow stars that poured from a tree? Anyone know the name? The ground as sky. The dead slumber. Decades pass. Beloved Mother. In Loving Memory. She loved the sea. Flowerless. Forgotten. This heaven was the toil of stiff hands. The invention of paradise. Lost. Airplane-filled. A single taste. A myth cascades. Rock and soil call the return to dust. Go back to where you came from.

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Passing in the Middle Kingdom: Genus Mui Wo

This is Mui Wo at night. The path up to my former home. It’s wonderfully quiet and there’s a calm truth to being outside with the frogs and the darkness in utter safety. Forgotten. Lost. Present. I always felt very out of place in Hong Kong, but I have concluded that this is the nature of the city, both historically and currently, as it is a population that has been shaped by the confluence of

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Passing in the Middle Kingdom: I Never Liked Redheads

This poem appeared in the hard copy journal Voice and Verse Poetry Magazine Intercourse and Intertextuality (2019). Myself, ex, and child were in London. We stayed in Canary Wharf. Shout out to Mark Higham @theartshop360 for the image. I sat in the bathtub writing. Yes, at 3AM. I had spent the day alone pushing my child along in a stroller and went to the Tate. I can’t remember the exhibit. I remember wheeling the push

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Hawai’i: Bad Tourist

Yes, and so begins my new candid show called ‘BAD TOURIST’. In this series, I will reveal and expose some of the stuff that tourists do when they come to Hawai’i that yes, deserves the title: BAD TOURIST. This is not BAD as in COOL. This is BAD as in these are examples of BAD IDEAS. You come on holiday to be safe and have fun and enjoy the beauty and outdoors. You do not

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Passing in the Middle Kingdom: The Forgetting

I have posted this poem The Forgetting elsewhere. It’s never been published by a journal. It is one of the most significant poems that I have written and I stand by it as a piece of writing. It came to me quickly. I was at the Hong Kong ferry pier and had a pencil and a wrinkled piece of paper in my bag. I stopped and wrote it down leaning against a steel column breathing

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Adolescence and Clothing: Inner and Outer Selves

These patched retro Levi’s jeans are from my very early adolescence, fashion-wise–from that leftover phase of hippy rebellion. As someone from the GenX cut-off year, I was influenced by this era older than myself and the era in which I lived. At boarding school, I swapped three skirts for this pair of blue jeans that has small embroidered hearts in purple and pink on the back pocket. Thanks, Mary, yes, I still have them. I

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Woman. Warrior. Writer. Deesha Philyaw

It’s time for our WOMAN WARRIOR tribute post, done in the spirit of Maxine Hong Kingston. I hope that by presenting women writers, creators, and leaders here, that we can learn, better our own lives, and change our communities. Today’s WOMAN WARRIOR is award winning author of short story collection, THE SECRET LIVES OF CHUCH LADIES. Please meet Deesha Philyaw 👩🏿📚 @deeshaphilyaw’s debut short story collection, The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, won the 2021

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Hawai’i: Meals

Mom made this before The Kid left for the Mainland. Ribs, potato salad, cornbread, and salad. Mom makes good ribs. Koreans do ribs well–kalbi, but these were Memphis style ribs. It is hard to fathom that my parents lived in Memphis for over 30 years! They were pioneering Korean Americans integrating the US. It is often a challenge being Asian in the South where life is constructed under a polarity of Black and White. I have

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Passing in the Middle Kingdom: The Rape of Pink Lily

When I lived in Luk Tei Tong, one day I looked out onto the green bog and saw this perfect lily: a Red Oriental Lily. It struck me as so strange. Someone had dumped a plant into this bog–the fallow rice fields, and it had grown. So there it was, defiant, glorious, no matter what had happened to it. It had refused to yield. People threw all kinds of stuff in the bog and there

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CUT THE CORD

Cut the Cord I cut the cord of connection of belief of desire of obligation of responsibility of care. I cut the cord knowing that indifference casts myself into an unknown. I cut the cord knowing it no longer matters. I cut the cord understanding intimacy is not violent, it is knowing. I cut the cord knowing to be seen I need to see myself. I cut the cord. I cut this cord to move

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Flyer for Dr. Stephanie Han and Ishle Yi Park Fireside Chat

The Poetry and Song of Ishle Yi Park

I interviewed Ishle Yi Park, the first woman to become Poet Laureate of Queens for the Council of Korean Americans and for  THROB aka The Hawai’i Review of Books! Park is also a 2021 Na Hoku Nominee for Female Vocalist of the Year, Album of the Year, and Song of the Year in Hawaii. She’ll be teaching grades 9/10 girls this summer Exploring Romeo and Juliet.

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Hawai’i: How We See

There are times when my eyes are flooded with color. As I’ve mentioned before since being diagnosed with osteoperosis in December 2020, I have shifted my ideas of health. I’m trying now to think about making my body healthy from the inside out. This is also probably due to the rewiring of my body and brain after divorce. There is a keen awareness of mortality. I must drink this in and what is it? Laughing

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Hawai’i: Health and Eating During COVID 19

To get The Kid through exams I said, hey let’s go to Rainbow Drive In. I’ll be honest, this is where The Kid goes post surf with Uncle N the surf instructor. Uncle N is the main reason that both myself and the Kid are still alive after a year of COVID. You’d think only one of us would have made it through. Try COVID with a very athletic 13-14 year old. Strategies included installing

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Passing in the Middle Kingdom: Out of the Depths

I have written and posted about Out of the Depths in a few places. It was previously published, in a different form in Vice-Versa as a prose poem. I wrote this poem in a fit of absolute despair? I wrote it quickly. I’m reluctant to act like this was some mystical act of writing because in the end, writing is about going to the page whether you want to or not. But this was an

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Write Your Divorce Story: Four Steps

There are four steps you need to take or at least strongly consider doing as you ready for divorce. Everyone is different, so understand that I am giving advice based on my personal experience and circumstances. I found there wasn’t much out there for women who were divorcing–unlike the wedding industry. So here are my four steps: Legal representation: You need a lawyer, so interview them. Shared business, financial, and legal documents: Assess what you

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Hawai’i: Health and Life

Every week I hike the Kokohead Trail. This trail provides a beautiful view once you hit the top, but you are climbing steps up the entire way. Steep steps. I do it faster or slower, but mostly, I just get up there and speed is not a priority which is good because if it was, I’d never bother with anything. I’m fast small picture, but big picture, I’m kind of slow and do things at

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Passing in the Middle Kingdom: An Ocean Ago

I haven’t read poetry in public over the past decade, so in March when I had the opportunity to do this with The Literary Cypher run by LP Kersey and Obsidian Pen Publishing, it was really fun! Poetry is community and the expectations around reading and writing poetry, at least for me, are much different than writing prose. I read some poetry from my manuscript Passing in the Middle Kingdom, which is, if you have

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Flyer for Dr. Stephanie Han and Ishle Yi Park Fireside Chat

Translating & Transforming Han Through Art: A Fireside Chat with Ishle Yi Park

Source: Council of Korean Americans Youtube “On June 15, 2021. CKA’s Women’s Affinity Group hosted a special event with Ishle Yi Park, the first woman to become Poet Laureate of Queens. She is also a 2021 Na Hoku Nominee for Female Vocalist of the Year, Album of the Year, and Song of the Year in Hawaii. Moderated by Author, Speaker, and Educator, Dr. Stephanie Han. Ishle Yi Park is teaching a class, Exploring Romeo &

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THROB: Let’s Start with Death

Dear Reader, I’m excited that a second letter from my column THE DOCTOR IS IN is up! The first one ‘Solo Writer’ explains my lens and philosophical outlook that guide my answers. THROB The Hawai’i Review of Books is a brand-new publication and I am honored to be a part of this effort. If you want to ask a question about writing, literature, craft, process, teaching or creativity –contact me by filling out the form

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Gods and Pineapples: The Original 1.5 Generation Korean Americans

Gods and Pineapples. These two ideas and objects defined my family and many others for a century. This is from a decades long project of mine and so I’ll be posting on this too… You feel alone and isolated. You feel like you are doing what no Korean has ever done before. You feel trapped between cultures. You feel like your parents don’t understand you. You say, this is because I am a 1.5 Korean

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Asian Americans: Education, Achievement, and Confucianism

I am writing this because I think it is important for students themselves (as well as others) who are Asian American, to potentially gain a cultural perspective on a particular philosophy that really underscores an Asian approach to education. This is Confucianism. Feel free to google as your information may be more informative than this brief post. I am presenting a surgically sliced sliver of it. Those who are experts in the field, in particular, those

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Passing in the Middle Kingdom: Building the Great Wall

To continue this creative process explication of poetry and writing, I’ll be going through the poems I wrote and discussing the background a bit. This is really to show anyone interested in poetry how some poems are constructed. I’m not big on “oh it’s this magical thing…I wait and boom from the heavens, I feel words rushing through me”. If that’s you, more power to you, and that’s great. I get it. But I’m a

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Writer’s Block (an excerpt from Write Your Divorce Story)

Writer’s Block When my lawyer asked me to deliver the story in a few weeks I easily agreed, but when it came time to begin I procrastinated. I told anyone who asked that I was spending all day writing, but hours would pass and all I would have were a few hastily written words and doodling. I drank lots of coffee. I tried different pastries at a new cafe down the block. I listened to

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Master Kang Rhee and Memphis

My father’s cousin was Kang Rhee, the founder of Pa Sa Ryu and the Kang Rhee studio in Memphis. Kang Rhee is known by many for having taught Elvis Presley. If you ever see a picture of Elvis with an Asian man in front of a Cadillac–that’s him! Elvis Presley gave him a Cadillac. What’s interesting about Memphis is that nearly every person has some tale about Elvis or Elvis proximity. For example, my dentist

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Dr. Stephanie Han wearing glasses in front of a scenic viewpoint

Wearing Glasses

I try to wear my glasses as much as possible in photos to encourage girls to wear glasses. I’ve been wearing glasses since I was 8 years old in the 3rd grade. I distinctly remember excitedly telling my friend that I was going to get glasses; she did not share my enthusiasm. I was so happy to get glasses! My 4th grade picture is me in gold wire frame glasses with tape. Dad did this

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How I Began Passing in the Middle Kingdom

I began writing what would become “Passing in the Middle Kingdom”, an unpublished poetry manuscript I started the summer of 2008 when I moved to Mui Wo, Lantau, Hong Kong from Los Angeles. The manuscript was a finalist for the Wilder Prize and most of the pieces have been published in various drafts. It is a very clear document of the collapse of my marriage, the longing for clarity, the fatigue and joy of early

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Adventures in Teaching and Girlhood

In the spirit of uploading content on a daily basis my recognition that this will take more than I had planned out, I will be excerpting my manuscript Passing in the Middle Kingdom, explicating the story behind the poem in hopes that people might be encouraged to scribble their own. I’m a believer in creating text and how this can change your life. I began writing this collection of poetry/prose, a type of hybrid work,

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Flyer for Council of Korean Americans Event: Learning How Korean Americans Shaped History Part II, Dr. Stephanie Han in the left-hand corner

Learning How Korean Americans Shaped History

Last month, I presented a two-part lectures series for the Council of Korean Americans on the events and personalities crucial to shaping Korean American culture and history over the last 100+ years. I made it accessible to those who don’t know any Korean American history. I also believe the big step we must take is to understand that WE CREATE HISTORY! Record your experiences. They’re historical! Dr. Han explores the various narratives of “Korean America”,

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Dr. Stephanie Han logo, yellow circle with blue accents and text "drstephaniehan"

Names and Titles

I thought it would be good for people to know the general story of why I use the title “doctor” professionally. Many people who have PhDs in literature do not go by this title. Creative writers who have PhDs don’t use it much either. To do this, I have to do a bit backtracking in terms of my educational journey. PhD Journey I started my PhD by default. I was supposed to be hired to

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grateful, I am

I don’t always fill out the ole Panda Journal, but I like to kick off my day with a bit of thinking about the good stuff. I got these Panda journals for myself and The Kid. For a minute we both did them. I’d say, “Hey, let’s Panda this morning.” But now, alas, it’s just me. Anyway, I realize I had done self-talk like this on and off during my life. But what divorce taught

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Woman. Warrior. Writer. Anne Liu Kellor

In the spirit of Maxine Hong Kingston, our WOMAN WARRIOR tribute presents women writers, creators, and leaders. Here we can learn, better our own lives, and change our communities. For API Month 2021 I would like you to meet Anne Liu Kellor. How did you come to author your life? The process of coming into my power is ongoing. I first learned to claim what I want when I traveled alone to China, my mother’s

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Write Your Divorce Story and Stand Up Now

Aloha, This is me three years ago. I had boarded a plane from Hong Kong utterly shattered. In fact, I had missed my layover flight from Seoul to the US despite being right at the gate — they were calling my name over and over on the loudspeaker (I found out later) and I was on the phone completely thrashed and talking to a friend and didn’t hear anything. I had to spend the night

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API Month 2021

This image in Tai Tei Tong, Mui Wo, Lantau, Hong Kong was taken in 2014 and made the Smithsonian Asian Pacific Island American Heritage Month Day-in-the-Life event that year! I had submitted it, but didn’t realize it was chosen until 2019. I thought I’d share it as it is May and APIA month! If you were a kid, the village square in Mui Wo was where it all went down. Kids chased by grandpa with

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Taos Writers Conference sponsored by SOMOS July 25

I’ll be teaching at the Taos Writers’ Conference a workshop on Identity and Voice: The Narrative of Group and Self on July 25, 2021. This workshop will cover both the process and craft of writing fiction. How does an individual’s voice determine how stories are shaped, which stories are told. How do we write ourselves into being? What are the limits and possibilities of the stories of the group and the stories of the individual—how

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Author Your Life

Write your story! These online classes are your opportunity to craft your emotional truth through the art of narrative. Learn craft, process, interact with writers, and express your creativity in a space that honors your story. Author Your Life Because writing is a way to discover the self. Because once you empower yourself through narrative, you transform your life. Because your best life is now. Because your existence builds community and changes society. Because the

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1982. Phillips Academy Andover. Barnard College. Vincent Chin. Asian America.

Aloha…Ye Olde Blog will begin again… When I saw this #stopasianhate video I am reminded of where we are now, socially and politically as a society, but also, who I was at the time when I first became aware of how racism is systemic (Vincent Chin lived in the auto making industry area, people were anti-Asian and mired in Yellow Peril ideology about the auto industry, and so they killed him for being Japanese—he was

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Title card for my CKA episode with Chang Rae Lee

Deep Diving into My Year Abroad and the Asian American Experience with Chang-Rae Lee

Source: Council of Korean Americans Youtube “Our second episode of season 3 of the Korean American Perspectives Podcast features Chang-Rae Lee, a celebrated Korean American novelist. To speak with him, we have guest host, Stephanie Han, Ph.D. who is an award-winning author, educator, and speaker. In this episode, Chang-Rae Lee and Dr. Stephanie Han take a deep dive into his latest novel, My Year Abroad. They explore the novel’s themes, its colorful characters, and adventures,

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Dr. Stephanie Han holding a copy of Nahid Rachlin's Persian Girls

Monday Books No. 20: Persian Girls by Nahid Rachlin

Aloha! For Monday Books I would like to recommend the classic memoir PERSIAN GIRLS by Nahid Rachlin. This memoir is an example of how lyricism and truth deliver transcendence. This is the art of literature at its best, and in its fluidity shows us how writing easily moves across genres. While categorized as memoir, the book gives reads like a novel. This is a masterful piece of writing and I highly recommend it as a

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Join the Write Your Divorce Story Facebook Group

Aloha, Please share this group info with women you know. I ask you to reach out to women you know who may be needing this resource. Why? Because women RARELY ask for help. I am NOT a therapist. But I am someone who has developed a framework for understanding that has worked for me and that has helped other women. I have decided to post concepts and methods that have been very effective for women

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Monday Books No. 19: A History of the Cetacean American Diaspora by Jenna Le

Aloha! It’s time for Monday books and I would like to recommend A History of the Cetacean American Diaspora by Jenna Le. This is a wonderful book of poetry full of texture, light, and feeling.  Yes, this is a book that even that disinterested non-reading adolescent who sits in the back of your class and is a rather big pain in the neck most of the time, will really enjoy. Yes, Bored Teen Boy entered

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Problems When Interpreting Asian Philosophy: In Group and Out Group

Like many people, particularly during this COVID situation, I’ve been diving into reading and listening to podcasts that are labeled self-help. For example, I can tell you how to declutter, although my own closet is a mess, because I have listened to 30 hours of decluttering podcasts while walking or doing chores. I can tell you the reasons you accumulate clutter. I could probably give a brief lecture on it myself! I am now purging

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Belief Systems: Context is Everything

Like many people, particularly during this COVID situation, I’ve been diving into reading and listening to podcasts that are labeled self-help. For example, I can tell you how to declutter, although my own closet is a mess, because I have listened to 30 hours of decluttering podcasts while walking or doing chores. I can tell you the reasons you accumulate clutter. I could probably give a brief lecture on it myself! I am now purging

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Monday Books No. 17: Pachinko

Aloha! Welcome to Monday Books in 2021. I’ll be recommending Greatest Hits and more recent titles by Asian/Asian American women writers TWICE a month. To kick off 2021, I want to recommend Pachinko by Min Jin Lee. Despite its length and its weighty subject matter, this is a book for everyone. It’s a book for someone who favors plot twist; it’s a book that gives a broad stroke overview of Koreans in Japan; it’s a

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Monday Books No. 16: Pei Pei – The Monkey King

Aloha! It’s time for Monday Books and today it’s a collection of poetry–Pei Pei the Monkey King by Wawa. Wawa writes in both English and Chinese and also publishes under Lo Mei Wa. This book references the 2014 Umbrella Revolution and features poems in both English and Chinese, along with an introduction by translator/poet Henry W. Leung and an interview with Wawa. These poems are playful, exuberant, and distinctly Hong Kong in their references to

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Monday Books No. 15: The Prince of Mournful Thoughts and Other Stories

Aloha! I want to recommend The Prince of Mournful Thoughts and Other Stories by Caroline Kim. This is literary fiction, and in its craft and worldmaking is literary realism at its best. The stories cover a range of times, places, and characters—but the book’s central characters are unapologetically Korean or Korean American. This is the book’s strength. I believe due to the proximity of whiteness, Asian American literature frequently navigates out of the space of

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I’m in Voice and Verse Magazine, Issue 56!

I was featured in Issue 56 of Voice and Verse Magazine. Voice and Verse Magazine is out of Hong Kong, so close to my heart as it is where my son spent his early childhood. I have deep feelings for the struggles of Hong Kong’s desire to assert itself as a society in the face of China. The hegemony of the state, the desire of the individual–this is the true sorrow of modern life. The

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Monday Books No. 14: Frameless Windows, Squares of Light

Aloha! Time for Monday books! Frameless Windows, Squares of Light by Cathy Song is rooted in the lyric. This work sings. Song is from Hawai’i and is of Chinese and Korean descent – one of the first to bring the words, stories, and feeling of Asian Americans to mainstream literary poetry audiences. She writes with a profound understanding of the significance of story. She has written many poetry books, beginning with Picture Bride, a Yale

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Monday Books No. 13: Enter the Navel

Aloha, it’s Monday books! I want to recommend Enter the Navel: for the love of creative nonfiction by Anjoli Roy. This is a slender volume downloadable for free by Creative Commons and also available in paperback. I assigned it as a class read. This is a lively, funny, and playful fast read, elicits great discussion, and the range of material about the belly button (personal anecdotes, myth, scientific analysis) was like going down the rabbit

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Monday Books No. 12: Saturday Night at the Pahala Theatre (1993)

Aloha, time for Monday books! There are certain books that speak of place and time, and yet, can resonate well beyond the initial publication date. I would place Lois-Ann Yamanaka’s excellent book of poetry Saturday Night at the Pahala Theatre (1993) in this category. Yamanaka says this book was “uncensored women’s voices” and this is the book’s power. Yamanaka’s writing is brutal, funny, raw, and filled with pathos, and her work never fails to engage

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Monday Books No. 11: Minor Feelings

Aloha! It’s time for Monday books and I highly recommend MINOR FEELINGS by Cathy Park Hong. I have posted about this book prior, but having now witnessed the transformational discussions it inspires in my own class, I believe this book to be one of, if not the most significant piece of writing TO DATE about race and identity, and the lives of Asian American women.  Essays are straightforward and the prose is intelligent, angry, vulnerable,

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Tuesday Books No. 10: Body Papers

Aloha, it’s TUESDAY books! This will become MONDAY books as of November 2! The pick this week is THE BODY PAPERS by Grace Talusan. A first generation Filipina, Talusan is a woman of faith and intellect and heart, and the winner of the Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing. This is a beautiful and honest book of personal exploration and reckoning. It is a very fast read—the prose is clear, the voice is steady

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Tuesday Books No. 9: Totem: America

Aloha, time for Tuesday books! Totem: America by Debra Kang Dean, author of five collections of poetry, reminds us how poetry opens us to feelings that are often too complicated to express and gives us the words we need to heal and live. Born in Hawai’i and of Korean and Okinawan ancestry, Dean is a serious practitioner of taiji, a master of lyricism, and writes of grief, connection, color and story. She guides the reader

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Tuesday Books No. 8: The Birth of Korean Cool

Aloha, time for Tuesday books! The Birth of Korean Cool (How One Nation is Conquering the World Through Pop Culture) by EunyHong is a funny exuberant read and will inform people about the basic hows and whys of Korean culture and the machinations of global K-pop culture. I believe that this book is highly relevantgiven the anti-Asian sentiment due to COVID, the Black/Asian dynamic in the US, and the truth of polyculturalism. K-pop embodies an

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Tuesday Books No. 7: The Magical Language of Others By E.J. Koh

Aloha! Time for Tuesday books! E.J. Koh’s The Magical Language of Others! Koh’s memoir will resonate for those caught between time and place, who seek an understanding between generations, and who look to words for answers. This book exposes the realities of economic global work, Confucian expectations translated into modern lives, and the brutality of people living out their ambitions. It paints a poignant and raw picture of how we try to manifest a certain

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Tuesday Books No. 6: I-Hotel

It’s Tuesday! Time for a book recommendation. I deem I-Hotel by Karen Tei Yamashita as the one novel to read if you want to understand the foundation of Asian America—its culture and art, its politics and aspirations. This book pushes aesthetic boundaries as seen in form, and it innovates in its delivery on every level. I would make this required reading for Asian American Studies and stick this on a university level American Literature syllabus.

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Tuesday Books No. 5: Portable Curiosities stories by Julie Koh

It’s time for Tuesday Books! I will be posting books written by Asian women, primarily those written in English, although I may also feature translated works. If you want to be featured, lmk and contact me through the ABOUT page or email. I am choosing books new or old that I believe to be relevant. Scroll back and you can see, but I will be also updating the website so you can see earlier selections.

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Three Poems in Cultural Weekly and On Art…

I was happy that three poems were published in Cultural Weekly. This is a great literary journal out of LA — vibrant and energetic. I like it because there are a range of poems and also, I respect the work of Chiwan Choi, a fellow Korean American writer. He has a good sense of humor and is fiercely dedicated to creative expression. People who spend their lives writing, editing, artmaking, and fostering communities and ideas

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Tuesday Books No.4: In the Company of Strangers by Michelle Skinner

In the Company of Strangers is a fine collection of short fiction. I’m highlighting it because I believe it to be strangely overlooked — and it shouldn’t be. Writing from the Overseas Filipino diaspora is complex and diverse. It speaks to the wildly disparate realities of a people who continue to carve out a place in the global consciousness and imagination. Skinner tells stories about a range of characters and time periods, and she does

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Tuesday Books No. 3: Hooping

Tammy Ho Lai-Ming’s Hula Hooping was 15 years from inception to publication. The writing has a liveliness and precision that is exuberant and without pretense. Word-play is that—play and fun! She invites the reader in with lyricism and wit. This is the kind of poetry I like to read because if I can’t move into the poem fairly quickly, I won’t hang out til the end. I want to hang out and read this book

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Tuesday Books No. 2: A Cab Called Reliable

This book A Cab Called Reliable by Patti Kim is an Asian American/Korean American literary classic and should be on every reading list for Asian American literature. This book was written decades before its time and Kim writes with authority, lyricism and fluidity. There is a complicated protagonist and the book reveals the raw truths of childhood and immigration. This story is about the dark side of Confucianism, how we are imprisoned by family and

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Tuesday Books No. 1: Why Karen Carpenter Matters

This is a great book. I bought it several months ago and started reading it. The author reveals to us the relevance of Karen Carpenter to American pop,  but also references her own life. This is an academic memoir free of jargon, written in fluid prose. Too often researchers are captive to the often unbearable unreadable lexicon of theory. Academics must use this and deftly to legitimize ideas that are new—and fields that are stigmatized

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VALID: A Medium Series By Stephanie Han

This is a MEDIUM series based on my current work-in-progress, a memoir (working title: VALID) that is based on my years at Phillips Academy Andover. I will be adding to this series on a weekly basis. It will include my memories, thoughts, ideas, and theories about education, knowledge, identity, and creative expression. Series written by Dr. Stephanie Han – medium

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IGNITE, Studying Korean American Literature with the Council of Korean Americans

I was really excited to be a part of the Council of Korean Americans summer fellowship program IGNITE. I delivered lectures on Korean American literature and identity, and narrative writing workshops on family and gender. This is a fantastic program for Korean Americans interested in understanding their roles and dreams within the United States and beyond. Many different questions and ideas were raised. For me personally, as a 3rd/4th generation American, this was a great experience

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PEN Emerging Voices Podcast: Polyculturalism, Podcasts, and the Pandemic

I was interviewed by Amanda Fletcher for the PEN podcast. Looking forward to seeing people in class next week! Check out the podcast here: 1999 EV Dr. Stephanie Han is our next guest on the podcast. She talks to us about polyculturalism, protests, and the pandemic; our increased ability to conceptualize a narrative after the internet; and delivers an inspirational rant on why we write that’s worthy of a Ted Talk. Listen and then sign up for one

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Korean American Perspectives: We Write the Stories of Our Community (Podcast)

Looking forward to the upcoming lecture and workshop series with the Council of Korean Americans for the CKA-Public Service Internship program. I spoke with Dr. Abraham Kim on the CKA podcast about storytelling, family, and writing. My lecture and workshop series will run from June 22-July 1. I am really excited to meet and work with young Korean Americans who are engaged in areas of public service and civic involvement. Community building is important to

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Books & Booze with Nana-Ama Danquah: Swimming in Hong Kong

I am so excited to have Swimming in Hong Kong chosen as a book club selection for the Nana-Ama Danquah Books & Booze hour! I’ll be zooming in the second half of the meeting! Please join and you don’t have to have read the book! Zoom invitation link: https://lnkd.in/gpGryzy Password: danquah #bookclub #SwimminginHongKong #hongkong #readingforpleasure #nanaamadanquah

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Read & Write with Dr. Han: Two Requirements for Good Writing

Last days of school. Given that it will be my last week of teaching at this school I decided to talk about what I believe are the two most significant requirements for good writing. You need to have something to say. This first element of good writing is not easily obtained in a classroom setting. Classes and teachers give you the tools to begin to ask questions, but they cannot teach you what to say.

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Heard/Word

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VH48GhHkXWY“HEARD / WORD is a new audio series from Galleyway highlighting compelling voices in poetry and prose. The series kicks off with author and poet Stephanie Han reading ‘A Garden’s Bones’ – an excerpt from her manuscript ‘Passing in the Middle Kingdom.’ For the full reading, visit galleyway.com/2020/4/27/heard-word-stephanie-han To find out how your reading can be featured, visit galleyway.com/blog/2020/3/31/call-for-audio-submissions”

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Read & Write with Dr. Han: Educators, My Ninth Grade Teacher Mr. Regan, Phillips Academy Andover

This series of posts on my teachers was inspired by Steven Dunn’s social media feed asking people to comment if they had a black teacher. My previous post was about Ms. Witwer, my 8th grade Social Studies teacher I had at Northwest Jr. High in Coralville, Iowa. I will now turn to Mr. Regan, my first English teacher at Phillips Academy Andover. I had quite a few. I entered his classroom at the age of

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Read & Write with Dr. Han: Educators, My Eighth Grade Teacher Ms. Witwer, Coralville, Iowa

This series of posts on my teachers was inspired by Steven Dunn’s social media feed asking people to comment if they had a black teacher. My previous post was about Mrs. Cromarty, one of two black teachers I had during my K-12 years. Ms. Witwer was my 8th grade Social Studies teacher at Northwest Junior High in Coralville, Iowa. Like almost all of my K-12 teachers, Ms. Witwer was white, good natured, and a dedicated

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Read & Write with Dr. Han: Educators, My First Grade Teacher Mrs. Cromarty, Seoul, Korea

Look for new posts MWF. This week, it will be posts on teachers. Audience: teachers, students, parents, educators, anyone who reads and writes… REFLECTING ON TEACHERS I’m probably inviting students to roll their eyes, but I will state that even if I had a teacher who was less than inspiring, I reflect now and acknowledge there was some takeaway from that experience. More later on Mrs. Martinez who carried a yardstick around and took the

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Read & Write with Dr. Han: Creative Process, PEN-Los Angeles Emerging Voices, ‘Company’

Aloha, A poem for National Poetry Month: ‘Company’. Stay healthy everyone. The world awaits and needs your well-being. We will be better than we were before. Keep the faith and believe in the possibility. I’m grateful to say that I participated in the PEN Emerging Voices Workshop, part of PEN America. PEN fostered then, and continues to nurture, the idea of voice and letters, and dedicates its efforts to protecting the beauty and ferocity of

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Read & Write with Dr. Han: Passing in the Middle Kingdom, Creative Process, and ‘Out of the Depths’

Aloha, Here we are sheltering in place. So many people are now turning to literature, poetry, and art to get through these times. By now, many have started to write, to record their thoughts and feelings about a time that is deeply traumatic, confusing, and unknown. When we have no familiarity with what we are faced with we often turn to art for solace, redemption, and hope. To that end, I thought I would post

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Read & Write with Dr. Han: Poetry in the Pandemic

Day 1 Today I began teaching. I wrote this between classes: Poetry in the Pandemic How do I tell them that this is the test for the gods? For we are alone here as we enter, as we leave. And the date has only moved up. This trial run is just a test, a black and white target of descending numbers on a screen. A series of red and yellow warnings. What we learn now is

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PBS Hawaii Long Story Short Interview

Award-winning writer Stephanie Han draws from her life experiences to inform her poetry, fiction and non-fiction, which frequently grapple with identity in multicultural settings. Her childhood was anchored by books, which helped her make sense of others and the world around her. Though her life has taken her around the globe, she now calls Honolulu home, working as a writer and educator.

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Dr. Stephanie Han speaking

Excerpt from Dr. Stephanie Han’s talk “Narrative as Life”

Academy of Creative Media, University of Hawaii Our lives are narratives—we are the art of narrative, and we must understand, guard, and cultivate our story, as if we do not, we are subject to the narratives that others impose upon us. Those are the narratives of people who are more powerful, who control us through government or money or paperwork or emotions, who want us to be something other than who we are. If we

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